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Celestial Creatures 5e

Last Updated on January 25, 2023

Solar 5e DnD
Solar Angel

The worlds we create to house our campaigns and adventures are strange and fantastic places. That is, after all, why we play such games, for the fun and sociability, yes, but also for the escapism and the chance to immerse ourselves in a world very different from our own.

Such worlds we find ourselves in via our characters have a certain amount of familiarity, though often it is a quasi-historical, medieval setting and the abundance of humans and human-like player characters. But then you can add layers of increasingly strange denizens to populate the world.

Some are creatures based on those found in our myths and legends, some are things straight out of horror stories, there are demons and devils, and then, right at the top are Celestial Beings, beings from beyond the mortal world, beyond this plane of existence and sometimes outside of time itself.

What Are Celestial Creatures in 5e?

If you are working strictly off the page of the 5e rules, then fourteen creatures are grouped as being of a Celestial nature.

They are not “good” in alignment, per se, but they are usually found to be fighting a good cause and originate in a heavenly domain. They are often encountered as protectors of holy places, messengers of the gods, or even avengers for some infraction or insult that the party may have caused.

The Monster Manual states that Celestial beings are …

…creatures native to the Upper Planes. Many of them are the servants of deities, employed as messengers or agents in the mortal realm and throughout the planes.”

It also emphasizes that such creatures are “good by nature”, but just as we have gods and higher powers of all alignments, doesn’t it follow that their minions would also be of varying alignments? You can make a good argument for that.

It’s one for the DM of your campaign, but logic would dictate that neutral or evil powers have similarly aligned servants to do their bidding. You can either create a whole pantheon of beasts to fill this gap, or you could allow corrupted unicorns or fallen couatl who have turned to the “dark side” and now serve a different god. It will certainly keep the players on their toes.

Common Celestial Characteristics

Celestial creatures are about as varied and unique as the gods they serve. But, that said, they have a few common traits.

To start with, when you read terms like god, deity, or higher power in this article, take the term to be a very loose idea. Sure, some creatures are the servants of a god, either directly serving them or acting as a defender of the faith.

But Celestial creatures can also be working on behalf of a goal or an ideal or attached to a specific quest or prophecy, perhaps being brought into being specifically to play their part in that epic narrative.

Alignment

Unicorn Celestial Creature 5e DnD
Unicorn

Also, Celestials are the embodiment of their alignment. Often, especially with player characters, alignment is allowed to take a back seat as the personality and quirks of that character evolve. Alignment is more of an initial guide or a general motivation.

With Celestial beings, alignment is everything. They are often the bridge between a god and the mortal world and, as the representative of that power on earth, embody everything such an alignment stands for.

So, does this mean they cannot change alignment at some point? No. Even accepted D&D canon has examples of Celestial creatures falling from grace (Zariel in Forgotten Realms swaps angelhood for an archduchess seat in the Nine Hells.) But, such a fall from grace, or indeed a redemption from evil, must be a big event that perhaps a whole adventure could be based around.

Powerful Aura

Celestial beings also have a confident presence. Even a lowly unicorn messenger will exude a powerful aura, emanating a sense of fear and awe, perhaps glowing as they radiate such evident power.

Inherent Powers

Other Celestial creatures have a variety of inherent powers, everything from natural radiant damage resistance or immunity, sometimes mundane weapons are less effective against them, and they are generally resilient to charm and fear effects.

And most of them can fly. After all, they can traverse dimensions, perhaps even time itself; flying should be relatively easy.

Pegasus Celestial Creature 5e DnD
Pegasus

Not only are these the common traits of these uncommon creatures, but it is a handy checklist for the DM who wants to build their own Celestials to serve the darker or more ambivalent powers found in their world.

Where Do Celestials Come From?

As a rule, Celestial creatures call the Upper and Outer planes home. If you are playing a Forgotten Realms campaign, this would be locations such as Elysium, Mount Celestia, and Ysgard. If the campaign you play in is your own design, any Heavenly Plane or Diabolical Abyss makes for a suitable residence.

Although some creatures regarded as Celestial live their life on the Prime Material realm — unicorns, pegasi, and couatls — most come from a domain far away in terms of planes of existence and so will be regarded as creatures of an almost alien nature when encountered.

These are not just other strange creatures to be encountered out in the wilds away from civilization. These are creatures that will blow the character’s mind.

But, as with RPG, it’s your world; why stick by the rules?

Maybe Celestial creatures come from a mirror world. Take a leaf out of the Greek Myths and have them living on top of a great mountain that heroes and adventures have tried in vain to climb for millennia.

Perhaps the entrance to their homeland is through a sacred lake, as the Celts believed. It’s your world, and we are talking about meta-physics here; create your own rules, and even then, don’t be afraid to break them.

Using Celestials in Your DnD Campaign

Celestial creatures are the ultimate ally… or villain. They are a fantastic tool for the DM who needs to give the party some help or, in turn, slow them down. And, because many of these creatures are extremely powerful, it doesn’t mean they will use all of their abilities to help or hinder.

Maybe they have taken an oath not to affect the destiny of the mortal realm; perhaps they see this realm as beneath them and just can’t be bothered.

Couatl celestial creature 5e DnD
Couatl

They make great avatars of their alignment and appear in various roles to help further that alignment goal. They may help or hinder the party’s goals, act as guides or seek to foil the mission, aid, and abet, confuse and obfuscate. Whatever you need from them as a DM, they are there for you.

Using Celestial Creatures As Allies

As mentioned above, these are powerful creatures, and just because they can use their power and influence doesn’t mean they will. If you are using them as an ally to a character or party, restrict their usage to that of a mentor figure or guide.

Remember, it is the characters who are the game’s heroes; they are trying to write their names into the annals of history. No hero worthy of the title will be happy when they lie down on their deathbed and, with their final breath, admits, “So, I had this friendly unicorn who did most of the difficult stuff for me!”

The ancients of our world often regarded the heroes and villains as like chess pieces, pawns in a game played by the gods for reasons that were not always clear; in the same way, a chess piece isn’t aware of the life and career of a Russian grandmaster.

So, perhaps Celestial creatures are merely the messenger between the godly chess player and the lowly pawn, a way of getting them to make a move that best helps them win this heavenly game.

Using them as a mentor is also a great way of restricting their influence on the game. This works best if the character or party has religious ties, although a good DM can work around this.

The quest they are undertaking may have significance for a temple or religion, so the Celestial creature has been sent to aid in its success. They might give you access to additional divine spells or train you in rare and guarded martial skills to assist the chance of success.

However you use them to aid the party, just remember to make sure they stay within the game and relegate the characters to walk-on parts and background characters in their own story.

Using Celestial Creatures As Villains

Celestial creatures make fanatstic villans. They often don’t care about the mortal world, seeing it at best as a plaything, at worst, an inconvenience. And if they think that of the place, imagine what they think of the beings that call it home.

In this regard, they might view you, the player character, the same way an Aberration might. If you are helpful, they might decide to keep you alive; if you become an irritant, they are prepared to squash you like a bug! Essentially, they hate you and have nothing to lose — a good grounding for the ultimate villain.

A Celestial villain will have goals that might seem fathomless to the mortals. The Celestial mind spans dimensions, eras, and worlds and can hold complex machinations and schemes like an afterthought. Your character took twenty minutes to decide which trousers to wear this morning!

Even if you are following the Monster Manual argument that Celestial creatures are essentially good, you can still use such creatures as villains.

Good isn’t the same as nice; after all, your mortal character can’t even see a fraction of the game they are playing and the sacrifices they are willing to make for the greater good. The end may justify the means. Even if that means your characters end, you are the price they consider worth paying!

And then there is this nugget from the Monster Manual.“…an angel is almost never mistaken in its judgments. This quality can create a sense of superiority in an angel.” Even a Celestial creature driven by good intent might be blinded by the ethics and morality of their actions.

Maybe they are too single-minded and can imagine only one worthy outcome. This will quickly put them on a collision course with the party, who see things in a less black-and-white way. Even if the party and Celestial creature are of the same alignment and, in general, are fighting for the same cause, the way they view the world might not be on the same page.

There may be an ancient prophecy at work. Perhaps it states that a child born under a particular sign and circumstances will one day overthrow the gods, and a Lawful Good angel has been tasked with destroying the individual, no matter what.

The mortal world may be the doorway to a realm whose monstrous inhabitants will pour through and destroy the Upper Planes of Existence, and the logical solution is to destroy the world that acts as this fiendish portal. Scenarios such as these are great ways of casting a Celestial creature in the perfect role of an evil adversary.

Scenarios are only bounded by the DM’s imagination. Still, however you cast the Celestial creature in the role of villain, their ultimate goals need to be monumental and potentially world-shaking.

Other Considerations When Introducing Celestial Creatures to Your Campaign

As Celestial creatures are essentially laws unto themselves, there are several other considerations regarding the rule mechanics and gameplay when using them in a session.

One is that many rule mechanics stipulate that it relates to humanoid creatures. Celestial creatures may appear humanoid physically, especially if you want to start designing your own. Still, for rules purposes, Celestial and humanoid are two different types of creature and should be regarded as such.

Another consideration is Celestial creatures immortal. That’s a tricky one and perhaps best left for the DM running the campaign to decide. But here are a few thoughts.

Celestial beings that are deities are immortal, their messengers and servants perhaps not. But the source book’s statistics are written in a way that implies that they can be killed. As they are Celestial beings, I would suggest that this means that they can be slain in the physical sense in the mortal world but immediately regenerate or perhaps do so after a period of rebirth in their immortal plain of existence.

They are not dead as such, but they are out of the game for this adventure. So, a tick against the adventure’s goals is not so much of a tick in the long term as you now have a Celestial being waiting for the opportunity to come back and reap revenge on you.

There is also the consideration as to whether gods themselves are Celestials. Again, this depends on the nature of your game. If gods are played as an abstract force only ever encountered by the mortal world through their minions, followers, and the gifts and powers that they bestow, then they are not Celestial creatures. They are something else, more significant, less tangible, and harder to define.

If, however, you want the gods to walk amongst you, you may treat them as Celestial creatures. Powerful but able to be slain in their physical form. They occasionally embody mortals, like a form of friendly and peaceable possession, and only have a fraction of their powers in this form. It is really up to how you want to play them.

List of Celestial Creatures in 5e

CreatureCRDescription
Couatl4Dragon-like winged serpents, intelligent, psionic
Deva10Humanoid angelic creatures, earthly messengers
Empyrean23Huge angelic creatures, children of gods
Hollyphant5Tiny flying elephant-like creatures
Ki-rin12Large golden deer-like creatures, extremely rare
Pegasus2White flying horse creatures, graceful and rare
Planetar16Humanoid super-strong angelic creatures, warriors of the gods
Solar21Most powerful of angelic creatures, commanders
Unicorn5Non-flying horned horses with powerful magic

Couatl

  • AC – 19
  • HP – 97 (13d8+39)
  • Speed – 30ft, 90ft flying
  • Alignment – Lawful Good
  • Saving Throws – Con +5, Wis +7, Cha +6
  • Res/Immune – Resistant to Radiant, Immune to Psychic – and Bludgeoning, Piercing, and Slashing from non-magic
  • Language – All

Couatl 5e Traits

  • Innate Spellcasting: The Couatl’s spellcasting ability is Charisma (spell save DC 14). It can innately cast the following spells, requiring only verbal components:
  • At will: detect evil and good, detect magic, detect thoughts
  • 3/day each: bless, create food and water, cure wounds, lesser restoration, protection from poison, sanctuary, shield
  • 1/day each: dream, greater restoration, scrying
  • Magic Weapons: The Couatl’s weapon attacks are magical.
  • Shielded Mind: The Couatl is immune to scrying and to any effect that would sense its emotions, read its thoughts, or detect its location.

Couatl 5e Actions

  • Bite: Melee Weapon Attack: +8 to hit, reach 5 ft., one creature. Hit: 8 (1d6 + 5) piercing damage, and the target must succeed on a DC 13 Constitution saving throw or be poisoned for 24 hours. Until this poison ends, the target is unconscious. Another creature can use an action to shake the target awake.
  • Constrict: Melee Weapon Attack: +6 to hit, reach 10 ft., one Medium or smaller creature. Hit: 10 (2d6 + 3) bludgeoning damage, and the target is grappled (escape DC 15). Until this grapple ends, the target is restrained, and the couatl can’t constrict another target.
  • Change Shape: The couatl magically polymorphs into a humanoid or beast that has a challenge rating equal to or less than its own, or back into its true form. It reverts to its true form if it dies. Any equipment it is wearing or carrying is absorbed or borne by the new form (the couatl’s choice). In a new form, the couatl retains its game statistics and ability to speak, but its AC, movement modes, Strength, Dexterity, and other actions are replaced by those of the new form, and it gains any statistics and capabilities (except class features, legendary actions, and lair actions) that the new form has but that it lacks. If the new form has a bite attack, the couatl can use its bite in that form.

Deva

  • AC – 17
  • HP – 136 (16d8+64)
  • Speed – 30ft, 90ft flying
  • Alignment – Lawful Good
  • Saving Throws – Wis +9, Cha +9
  • Skills – Insight +9, Perception +9
  • Res/Immune – Resistant to Radiant and magic, Immune to Psychic – and Bludgeoning, Piercing, and Slashing from non-magic
  • Condition Immune – Charmed, Exhaustion, Frightened
  • Language – All

Deva 5e Traits

  • Angelic Weapons: The Deva’s weapon attacks are magical. When the deva hits with any weapon, the weapon deals an extra 4d8 radiant damage (included in the attack).
  • Innate Spellcasting: The Deva’s spellcasting ability is Charisma (spell save DC 17). The deva can innately cast the following spells, requiring only verbal components:
  • At will: detect evil and good
  • 1/day each: commune, raise dead
  • Magic Resistance: The deva has advantage on saving throws against spells and other magical effects.

Deva 5e Actions

  • Multiattack: The deva makes two melee attacks.
  • Mace: Melee Weapon Attack: +8 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 7 (1d6 + 4) bludgeoning damage plus 18 (4d8) radiant damage.
  • Healing Touch (3/Day): The deva touches another creature. The target magically regains 20 (4d8 + 2) hit points and is freed from any curse, disease, poison, blindness, or deafness.
  • Change Shape: The deva magically polymorphs into a humanoid or beast that has a challenge rating equal to or less than its own, or back into its true form. It reverts to its true form if it dies. Any equipment it is wearing or carrying is absorbed or borne by the new form (the deva’s choice). In a new form, the deva retains its game statistics and ability to speak, but its AC, movement modes, Strength, Dexterity, and special senses are replaced by those of the new form, and it gains any statistics and capabilities (except class features, legendary actions, and lair actions) that the new form has but that it lacks.

Empyrean

  • AC – 22
  • HP – 313 (19d12+190)
  • Speed – 50ft
  • Alignment – Chaotic Good or Neutral Evil
  • Saving Throws – Str +17, Int +12, Wis +13, Cha +15
  • Skills – Insight +13, Persuasion +15
  • Res/Immune – Magic resistance, Immune to Bludgeoning, Piercing, and Slashing from non-magic
  • Language – All

Empyrean 5e Traits

  • Legendary Resistance (3/Day). If the empyrean fails a saving throw, it can choose to succeed instead.
  • Magic Resistance. The empyrean has advantage on saving throws against spells and other magical effects.
  • Magic Weapons. The empyrean’s weapon attacks are magical.

Empyrean 5e Actions

  • Maul. Melee Weapon Attack: +17 to hit, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 31 (6d6 + 10) bludgeoning damage. If the target is a creature, it must succeed on a DC: 15 Constitution saving throw or be stunned until the end of the empyrean’s next turn.
  • Bolt. Ranged Spell Attack: +15 to hit, range 600 ft., one target. Hit: 24 (7d6) damage of one of the following types (empyrean’s choice): acid, cold, fire, force, lightning, radiant, or thunder.

Hollyphant

  • AC – 18
  • HP – 36 (8d6+8)
  • Speed – 20ft, 120ft flying
  • Alignment – Lawful Good
  • Saving Throws – Dex +3, Con +4, Cha +6
  • Skills – Insight +13, Persuasion +15
  • Res/Immune – Immune to poison. Resistant to Bludgeoning, Piercing, and Slashing from non-magic
  • Language – Celestial, telepathy

Hollyphant 5e Traits

  • Aura of Invulnerability. An invisible aura forms a 10-foot-radius sphere around the hollyphant for as long as it lives. Any spell of 5th level or lower cast from outside the barrier can’t affect creatures or objects within it, even if the spell is cast using a higher level spell slot. Such a spell can target creatures and objects within the barrier, but the spell has no effect on them. Similarly, the area within the barrier is excluded from the areas affected by such spells. The hollyphant can use an action to suppress this trait until its concentration ends (as if concentrating on a spell).
  • Magic Weapons. The Hollyphant’s weapon attacks are magical.

Hollyphant 5e Actions

  • Tusks. Melee Weapon Attack: +3 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 3 (1d6) piercing damage.
  • Trumpet (3/Day). The hollyphant blows air through its trunk, creating a trumpet sound that can be heard out to a range of 600 feet. The trumpet also creates a 30-foot cone of energy that has one of the following effects, chosen by the hollyphant:
  • Trumpet of Blasting. Each creature in the cone must make a DC: 14 Constitution saving throw. On a failed save, a creature takes 17 (5d6) thunder damage and is deafened for 1 minute. On a successful save, a creature takes half as much damage and isn’t deafened. Nonmagical objects in the cone that aren’t being held or worn take 35 (10d6) thunder damage.
  • Trumpet of Sparkles. Creatures in the cone must make a DC: 14 Constitution saving throw, taking 22 (4d8 + 4) radiant damage on a failed save, or half as much damage on a successful one. Evil creatures have disadvantage on the saving throw. Good creatures in the cone take no damage.

Ki-rin

  • AC – 16
  • HP – 123 (13d10+52)
  • Speed – 60ft, 80ft flying
  • Alignment – Lawful Good
  • Saving Throws – Dex +9, Wis +8
  • Skills – Insight +8, Perception +8, Performance +10
  • Res/Immune – Resistant to Cold, Fire, Lightning
  • Language – Abyssal, Auran, Celestial, Common, Draconic; telepathy

Ki-rin 5e Traits

  • Legendary Resistance (3/Day). If the ki-rin fails a saving throw, it can choose to succeed instead.
  • Magic Resistance. The ki-rin has advantage on saving throws against spells and other magical effects.
  • Magic Weapons. The ki-rin’s weapon attacks are magical.

Ki-rin 5e Actions

  • Multiattack. The ki-rin makes three attacks: two with its hooves and one with its horn.
  • Hoof. Melee Weapon Attack: +9 to hit, reach 15 ft., one target. Hit: 10 (2d4 + 5) bludgeoning damage.
  • Horn. Melee Weapon Attack: +9 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 14 (2d8 + 5) piercing damage.

Pegasus

  • AC – 12
  • HP – 59 (7d10+21)
  • Speed – 60ft, 90ft flying
  • Alignment – Chaotic Good
  • Saving Throws – Dex +4, Wis +4, Cha +3
  • Skills – Perception +6
  • Language –  Understand Celestial, Common, Elvish, and Sylvan but can’t speak

Pegasus 5e Actions

  • Hooves. Melee Weapon Attack: +6 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 11 (2d6 + 4) bludgeoning damage.

Planetar

  • AC – 19
  • HP – 200 (16d10+112)
  • Speed – 40ft, 120ft flying
  • Alignment – Lawful Good
  • Saving Throws – Con +12, Cha +12, Wis +11
  • Skills – Perception +11
  • Res/Immune – Resistant to Radiant, magic; Resistant Bludgeoning, Piercing and Slashing from Nonmagical Attacks
  • Condition – Immune to being Charmed, Exhaustion, Frightened
  • Language – All, telepathy

Planetar 5e Traits

  • Angelic Weapons. The Planetar’s weapon attacks are magical. When the planetar hits with any weapon, the weapon deals an extra 5d8 radiant damage (included in the attack).
  • Divine Awareness. The Planetar knows if it hears a lie.
  • Magic Resistance. The Planetar has advantage on saving throws against spells and other magical effects.

Planetar 5e Actions

  • Multiattack. The Planetar makes two melee attacks.
  • Greatsword. Melee Weapon Attack: +12 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 21 (4d6 + 7) slashing damage plus 22 (5d8) radiant damage.
  • Healing Touch (4/Day). The Planetar touches another creature. The target magically regains 30 (6d8 + 3) hit points and is freed from any curse, disease, poison, blindness, or deafness.

Solar

  • AC – 21
  • HP – 243 (18d10+144)
  • Speed – 50ft, 150ft flying
  • Alignment – Lawful Good
  • Saving Throws – Int +14, Wis +14, Cha +17
  • Skills – Perception +14
  • Res/Immune – Immune to Necrotic, Poison; Resistant to Radiant, magic; Bludgeoning, Piercing, and Slashing from non-magic
  • Condition – Immune to Charmed, Exhaustion, Frightened, Poisoned
  • Language – All, telepathy

Solar 5e Traits

  • Angelic Weapons. The solar’s weapon attacks are magical. When the solar hits with any weapon, the weapon deals an extra 6d8 radiant damage (included in the attack).
  • Divine Awareness. The solar knows if it hears a lie.
  • Magic Resistance. The solar has advantage on saving throws against spells and other magical effects.

Solar 5e Actions

  • Multiattack. The solar makes two greatsword attacks.
  • Greatsword. Melee Weapon Attack: +15 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 22 (4d6 + 8) slashing damage plus 27 (6d8) radiant damage.
  • Slaying Longbow. Ranged Weapon Attack: +13 to hit, range 150/600 ft., one target. Hit: 15 (2d8 + 6) piercing damage plus 27 (6d8) radiant damage. If the target is a creature that has 100 hit points or fewer, it must succeed on a DC: 15 Constitution saving throw or die.
  • Flying Sword. The solar releases its greatsword to hover magically in an unoccupied space within 5 feet of it. If the solar can see the sword, the solar can mentally command it as a bonus action to fly up to 50 feet and either make one attack against a target or return to the solar’s hands. If the hovering sword is targeted by any effect, the solar is considered to be holding it. The hovering sword falls if the solar dies.
  • Healing Touch (4/Day). The solar touches another creature. The target magically regains 40 (8d8 + 4) hit points and is freed from any curse, disease, poison, blindness, or deafness.

Unicorn

  • AC – 12
  • HP – 67 (9d10+18)
  • Speed – 50ft
  • Alignment – Lawful Good
  • Res/Immune – Immune to Poison; Resistant to magic
  • Condition – Immune to Charmed, Paralyzed, Poisoned
  • Language – Celestial, Elvish, Sylvan, Telepathy 60 Ft.

Unicorn 5e Traits

  • Charge. If the unicorn moves at least 20 ft. straight toward a target and then hits it with a horn attack on the same turn, the target takes an extra 9 (2d8) piercing damage. If the target is a creature, it must succeed on a DC15 Strength saving throw or be knocked prone.
  • Magic Resistance. The unicorn has advantage on saving throws against spells and other magical effects.
  • Magic Weapons. The unicorn’s weapon attacks are magical.

Unicorn 5e Actions

  • Multiattack. The unicorn makes two attacks: one with its hooves and one with its horn.
  • Hooves. Melee Weapon Attack: +7 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 11 (2d6 + 4) bludgeoning damage.
  • Horn. Melee Weapon Attack: +7 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 8 (1d8 + 4) piercing damage.
  • Healing Touch (3/Day). The unicorn touches another creature with its horn. The target magically regains 11 (2d8 + 2) hit points. In addition, the touch removes all diseases and neutralizes all poisons afflicting the target.
  • Teleport (1/Day). The unicorn magically teleports itself and up to three willing creatures it can see within 5 feet of it, along with any equipment they are wearing or carrying, to a location the unicorn is familiar with, up to 1 mile away.

All Celestials in 5e

  • Aatxe
  • Achlys: God of Poisons, Sadness and Misery
  • Aeon
  • Akkorokamui
  • Alabaster Tree
  • Ammut
  • Andrenjinyi
  • Angel Cat (Felin)
  • Angel Cat, Seraph (Felim)
  • Angel of Alchemy
  • Angel of Dreams
  • Angel of Flames
  • Angel of Gates
  • Angel of Honor
  • Angel of Inspiration
  • Angel of Judgment
  • Angel of the Dark
  • Angel of the Wind
  • Angel, Diamond
  • Angel, Elpizo
  • Angel, Eye of the Gods
  • Angel, Fallen Empyreal
  • Angel, Guardian
  • Angel, Guiding Light
  • Angel, Iron
  • Angel, Kalkydra
  • Angel, Mead Archon
  • Angel, Oath
  • Angel, Pelagic Deva
  • Angel, Psychopomp
  • Angel, Shrouded
  • Angel, Uridimmu
  • Angel, Zirnitran
  • Angelic Emissary
  • Angelic Enforcer
  • Aphrodite: God of Love and Beauty
  • Ares: God of War and Destruction
  • Artemis: God of the Hunt and Moon
  • Astri
  • Athena: God of Wisdom and Warfare
  • Aviere
  • Avoral
  • Avoral
  • Azata, Bralani
  • Azata, Prydanu
  • Azata, Yamah
  • Blestsessebe
  • Blind Justice
  • Boreas: God of the Winter Winds
  • Buraq
  • Cadejo, White
  • Calydon’s Giant Boar
  • Celestial Aspect, Charity
  • Celestial Aspect, Chastity
  • Celestial Aspect, Diligence
  • Celestial Aspect, Kindness
  • Celestial Aspect, Patience
  • Celestial Aspect, Temperance
  • Celestial Eagle
  • Celestial Panda
  • Celestial Paragon
  • Celestial Sphinx
  • Celestial Squire
  • Celestial Warhorse
  • Cetaceal
  • Chained Angel
  • Chalkydri
  • Chamrosh
  • Cherubim
  • Church Grim
  • Cosmic Symphony
  • Couatl
  • Couatl, Tletli
  • Couatl, Xiuh
  • Cyonaxin
  • Daydream
  • Despair and Anger
  • Deva
  • Deva, Justiciar
  • Divine Boar
  • Divine Eagle
  • Divine Feline
  • Divine Horse
  • Divine Hound
  • Divine Owlbear
  • Divine Viper
  • Draconal
  • Ecstatic Bloom
  • Einherjar
  • Einherjar Derk
  • Einhest
  • Empyrean Kobold
  • Eye of the Gods
  • Eye of the Gods
  • Fidele
  • Firebird
  • Fylaka
  • Garuda
  • Ghillie Dubh
  • Giant Lynx
  • Guardian Creature, Komainu
  • Guardian Creature, Stone Lion
  • Guardian of the Light
  • Gugalanna
  • Hades: God of the Underworld
  • Haladron
  • Hawk, Celestial
  • Hecate: God of the Moon, Magic and Sorcery
  • Heidrun
  • Hephaestus: God of Blacksmiths and Fire
  • Hermes: God of Travel, Merchants and Thievery
  • Hope
  • Hundun
  • Incandescent One
  • Irid
  • Jyoti
  • Kamasuhn
  • Kinnara
  • Kirin
  • Kun Mur
  • Lamassu
  • Lantern Archon
  • Leonal
  • Living Star
  • Moon Dog
  • Moonkite
  • Mosaic Custodian
  • Niutomi
  • Nyx: Primordial God of the Night
  • Ophanim
  • Ophanim
  • Osphranteal (Kangaroo Agathion)
  • Pan: God of the Wild
  • Pegasus
  • Pescavitus
  • Planetar
  • Planetar, Lesser
  • Poseidon: God of the Sea
  • Qasogonaga
  • Quetzal
  • Ratatosk
  • Ratatosk Assassin
  • Ratatosk Commoner
  • Ratatosk Monk
  • Ratatosk Warlock
  • Sacred Hippopotamus
  • Sacred Witness
  • Saehrimnir
  • Sammael
  • Sanctified Angel
  • Sandman
  • Seer
  • Shadow of a Doubt
  • Shadow of Death
  • Shoki
  • Siege Archon
  • Simhamukha
  • Simian, Monkey King
  • Simurg
  • Singa
  • Sinhaleo
  • Skein Witch
  • Solar
  • Solar of War
  • Song Angel
  • Songster
  • Soul Guide
  • Star Incarnate
  • Stellar Bunny
  • Temple Dog
  • Thessal-Titan
  • Thrummren
  • Titan, Ancient
  • Titan, Elysian
  • Unicorn
  • Unicorn, Shaggy
  • Unicorn, Winged
  • Uraeus
  • Ursan Archon
  • Valkyrie
  • Valkyrie
  • Valkyrie
  • Valkyrie
  • Vedfolnir
  • White Stag
  • Word Archon
  • World Turtle
  • Yaojing
  • Zeus: Supreme God of the Sky
  • Zoryas

Final Thoughts on Celestial Creatures in 5e

Like Aberrations, Celestial creatures are laws unto themselves, so much fun can be had with them. Firstly they add a lot of unique flavor to your own DnD world as you can change the rules, change the creature’s nature, and even make your own. This is one area where the rules are there to be broken or twisted into new shapes.

They make perfect villains and brilliant allies; they enable the DM to move the adventure along if the party finds themselves up against an immovable force, and they enable the DM to slow things down and throw the party off the scent if they are racing through your adventure faster than you would like.

They also set up some fantastic scenarios regarding prophecies and religious wars and hint at games being played by the gods above that are beyond the understanding of us mortals.

Just remember to keep things in check, use them sparingly, and add their powers and abilities even more. It is always great to have a powerful ally, and it is fun to be pitted against the ultimate villain.

But remember that the characters need to be the lead roles in the book that your sessions are collectively writing. No matter how big and powerful a Celestial creature is, remember that they are not in charge — not really — and that the DM and the players are the real stars of the show.

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01/31/2023 05:34 pm GMT
Celestial Creatures in 5e DnD

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Monster Manual
$49.95 $27.49

Buy on Amazon Buy at Noble Knight
We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.
01/31/2023 05:34 pm GMT